Entryway Bar

Man oh man, as we approach our one-year blogiversary I am constantly surprised by how much our home has changed in just a few short months! Take for example the entryway. . . here it is during our house tour in July.

TFP HT 8

Here it is today.

TFP Kitchen Bar 10

What a beauty!

Let’s see, we took down the wall paper, textured and painted the kitchen, added some built-in benches, thrifted some new-to-us chairs, and just earlier this week I showed you how I redid my kitchen desk. Whew! We have been busy bees! (I also got a new camera which helps a LOT!)

Did you notice something else that’s ‘new’? Here’s a hint. . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 9

That’s right, we’ve updated our kitchen bar! When my in-laws were here last fall, you know, updating my kitchen, they were also on the hunt for a Christmas present project and they found it in that ugly blue laminate bar.

My father-in-law, Greg, is a fanominal wood worker had the idea to build a cover for the existing counter-top so we sent him the desired dimensions, he built the cover in Florida and we brought it back at Thanksgiving. Side note, the bar had a large over hang on the the eat-in kitchen side which made it really uncomfortable to sit on the bench. When my brothers were here at Christmas they helped Phillip cut the existing bar down to size.

They started by removing the counter-top. . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 1

. . .which caused a few stones to loosen and fall . . . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 2. . . which got put back in place with heavy-duty adhesive. . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 3. . . .ahhhhhh, much better.

TFP Kitchen Bar 4

The counter-top was cut to fit the cover and screws were attached to the bottom (this part will make sense in a minute). . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 5

. . . concrete was mixed and put in the center opening. . . .

TFP Kitchen Bar 6

TFP Kitchen Bar 7

. . . the counter-top was placed on top (screws went into the concrete) and checked to make sure it was level.TFP Kitchen Bar 8

We let the concrete sit for a few days and then began the process of staining and sealing the cover.

My dad is a farmer which means he has lots of awesome (as Phillip says, “old”) stuff. A few years ago he gave some old barn wood to Greg and he’s been using in on projects for us ever since. This particular piece has a walnut inlay from the barn wood.

TFP Kitchen Bar 13

The outer pieces got a few coats of stain and then the whole thing got LOTS of poly which brings us to the almost-finished final product.

TFP Kitchen Bar 12

I say almost because you see that little white square at the end of the bar? That’s how far the original counter extended and it needs to be sanded, textured and painted before we permanently attached the cover.

TFP Kitchen Bar 9

I’ll just add it to the list of 100 other small things that need to be done around here. . . . but there you have it, a brand new bar! What room in your home to you feel has made the most progress?

 

 

What do you think?